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Thread: Beer

  1. #241
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    Re: Beer

    Quote Originally Posted by bone View Post
    I don’t think this is true. Micro brews and smaller are popping up everywhere. You see a little of what you describe when they are developing their taste for beer, but there’s never been so many delicious options as there are today. I know personally when I was in my late teens, I liked the light tasting beers but that’s grown into a love of all the varieties I enjoy today.
    Absolutely this. American beer *had* (past tense) a bad reputation for beer because of Bud and similarly flavorless macro brews. The reality is, as the microbrewing revolution took off in the US, they have been pushing the boundaries of brewing for some time now, and are making some of the best beer in the world. Breweries like Sierra Nevada, Stone, Dogfish Head, Samuel Adams, Clown Shoes, Epic, and so on, are reviving long dead styles, inventing new ones, combining old styles, and pushing limits on existing styles. Yes, of the thousands of craft breweries that have opened up, some are bad. Some of the newer, bolder styles aren't for everyone. I love a good 100-IBU American-style Imperial IPA, but that can be way too bitter for some. But I don't know where the idea that "millennials won't stand for" flavor in their beers, that is far more a cry of the older generation that can't tolerate change and need mountains to change color on their beer so that they know the beer is cold enough to numb their taste buds so that they won't have to taste how terrible it actually is.

    Canada, the prairie provinces in particular, has been slower to embrace the microbrewing revolution. Quebec and BC have led the pack, Quebec having more of a Belgian inspired influence, BC more of an American "west coast hops" influence. Ontario, to a lesser extent has had more of a British beer influence. In the past, Alberta had lax importing regulations which was good for the consumer in that we could get a great selection of beers from anywhere in the world. However, the environment was terrible for beer producers, as the other provinces have very protectionist policies that won't allow Alberta beers on their shelves while we let everything on ours. Changes in laws have made it easier for local beers to be competitive locally, and made it easier to open small batch breweries, so we are finally starting to see more and more craft breweries starting to open. Some are generic and boring, trying to compete with the Labatts and Molsons that still dominate the landscape, but others are innovating and following the American craft trend of teaching people that flavor in beer is a good thing, not a bad thing.
    Last edited by nafnikufesin; 11-25-2018 at 01:55 PM.

  2. #242
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    Re: Beer

    Quote Originally Posted by GungaDin View Post
    If enjoy all the variety of beer that can be produced using the seemingly endless varieties of barley, hops and yeast. I also enjoy an occasional fruit beer, like a Wild Rose's Cherry Porter or Alley Kat's Aprikat. It's when I see a mango milkshake IPA, or other mish-mash of flavours, (and I've tried a few) I wonder, why? I think the Germans had the right idea with the Reinheitsgebot. Enjoy your beers and I'll enjoy mine.
    Oddly, the Germans couln't even stick to that themselves. One German ruler pronounced that wheat would be allowed in beers because of his love for hefeweizens. Gose biers, brewed with salt, coriander, and lactic acid producing bacteria, originated in Germany in the 16th century, after the German purity law was declared.

    Most macro beers in North America wouldn't fit, either. Budweiser uses 50% rice in place of malt to lighten the body and flavor, not to mention it's much cheaper. Molson, Coors, Miller, Labatt use 50% corn for the same reason.

    I've always preferred the Belgian (and American craft) approach of pushing more flavor into beer, and not being afraid to use other ingredients to enhance the flavors already in beer. The mango milkshake IPA you alluded to, for example, tkaes a basic IPA, but as the hops used are from New Zealand, they have a tropical fruit flavor naturally, which the mango accentuates. The "milkshake" refers to the addition of lactose, an infermentable sugar most commonly used in "milk stous" (aka sweet stouts) thatincrease the body and residual sweetness of the beer, producing a fuller, creamier sensation on the palate.

    Hops from the US will often have a citrus or pine quality, so they pair well with citrus fruits such as grapefruit in an IPA. European hops often have a peppery or spicy character, so pair well with those flavors. Belgian yeasts produce fruity esters and spicy phenols as they ferment, so Belgian brewers have often augmented this with the addition of spices. Darker and roasted malts in porters and stouts often already take on a chocolate or coffee character, so adding a little extra of those flavors will accentuate what is already there. Basically, a creative brewer is just doing a beer and food pairing, except the food is in the beer. I get that is not everyone's cup of tea (although chai in a Belgian beer pair very well ), but the fact is, the limits of beer are really only limited by the imagination of the person who brews it, and the person who drinks it. Cheers!

  3. #243
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    Re: Beer

    Quote Originally Posted by nafnikufesin View Post
    Oddly, the Germans couln't even stick to that themselves. One German ruler pronounced that wheat would be allowed in beers because of his love for hefeweizens. Gose biers, brewed with salt, coriander, and lactic acid producing bacteria, originated in Germany in the 16th century, after the German purity law was declared.

    Most macro beers in North America wouldn't fit, either. Budweiser uses 50% rice in place of malt to lighten the body and flavor, not to mention it's much cheaper. Molson, Coors, Miller, Labatt use 50% corn for the same reason.

    I've always preferred the Belgian (and American craft) approach of pushing more flavor into beer, and not being afraid to use other ingredients to enhance the flavors already in beer. The mango milkshake IPA you alluded to, for example, tkaes a basic IPA, but as the hops used are from New Zealand, they have a tropical fruit flavor naturally, which the mango accentuates. The "milkshake" refers to the addition of lactose, an infermentable sugar most commonly used in "milk stous" (aka sweet stouts) thatincrease the body and residual sweetness of the beer, producing a fuller, creamier sensation on the palate.

    Hops from the US will often have a citrus or pine quality, so they pair well with citrus fruits such as grapefruit in an IPA. European hops often have a peppery or spicy character, so pair well with those flavors. Belgian yeasts produce fruity esters and spicy phenols as they ferment, so Belgian brewers have often augmented this with the addition of spices. Darker and roasted malts in porters and stouts often already take on a chocolate or coffee character, so adding a little extra of those flavors will accentuate what is already there. Basically, a creative brewer is just doing a beer and food pairing, except the food is in the beer. I get that is not everyone's cup of tea (although chai in a Belgian beer pair very well ), but the fact is, the limits of beer are really only limited by the imagination of the person who brews it, and the person who drinks it. Cheers!
    I need to drink a beer with you and listen to some Anthrax tunes. Although you might break my brain.

  4. #244
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    Re: Beer

    let's just all agree beer is proof God wants us to be happy

    14ace2e6-b666-4aaa-ba84-c9e71f9400c5_1.a67fc81f40b100f15570eb759ad8e7be.jpg
    In Rod we trust

  5. #245
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    Re: Beer

    Quote Originally Posted by bone View Post
    I need to drink a beer with you and listen to some Anthrax tunes. Although you might break my brain.
    Dude, I'm always down for a pint and some metal. Throw in some football, and you have yourself a deal!

  6. #246
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    Re: Beer

    Quote Originally Posted by tigerdar View Post
    let's just all agree beer is proof God wants us to be happy

    14ace2e6-b666-4aaa-ba84-c9e71f9400c5_1.a67fc81f40b100f15570eb759ad8e7be.jpg
    Cheers to more beers!

    More beer geek trivia: the original German purity law didn't include yeast as one of the ingredients, because it hadn't been discovered yet. Medieval brewers called the magic ingredient that fermented wort into beer simply "godisgoode".

  7. #247
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    Re: Beer

    Quote Originally Posted by bone View Post
    I don’t think this is true. Micro brews and smaller are popping up everywhere. You see a little of what you describe when they are developing their taste for beer, but there’s never been so many delicious options as there are today. I know personally when I was in my late teens, I liked the light tasting beers but that’s grown into a love of all the varieties I enjoy today.
    I phoned John H. Sleeman the CEO of Sleeman's Brewery in Guelph one time some thirteen years ago (to his credit he answered his own phone) to ask him a few questions about his company and its stock. He told me that the truth of the matter was that beer is an acquired taste, and kids don't actually like it but drink it solely due to peer group pressure. Beer must however be brewed to appeal to young drinkers. Otherwise a brewery is selling to a dying market.

    He told me that his brew masters on a regular basis specifically measured the bitterness units competitors' brews contained, and Heineken's were way done from what they were historically. Heineken had been dumbed down to conform with modern tastes. That's how Heineken managed to increase its sales in North America, by appealing to the lowest common denominator.

    I've never gotten over my bitterness at the absorption of Labatt's, where my father worked for 26 years and I worked for four summers while at Western, by the mega multinational Interbrew. That brewing colossus now includes Anheuser-Busch which was at the forefront of the charge to bland in the States (imagine rice in beer for f's sake)!

    Last edited by Foxhound; 11-26-2018 at 09:31 AM.
    Radically Canadian!

  8. #248
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    Re: Beer

    4 beer company CEOs walk into a bar

    The CEO of Budweiser orders a Bud Light.

    The CEO of Miller orders a Miller Light.

    The CEO of Coors orders a Coors Light.

    The CEO of Guinness orders a Coke.

    The first three ask the CEO of Guinness why he didn't order a Guinness, to which he replied:

    "I figured if you 3 weren't ordering beer it would be rude for me to."
    no phone and internet for 36 hrs due to windstorm. life was hell.

  9. #249
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    Re: Beer


  10. #250
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    Re: Beer

    Stock up on toilet paper. Either of those brand line-ups would be enough to leave a fellow with the runs for months - punctuated by the occasional technicolor yawn of course.

    Last edited by Foxhound; 11-26-2018 at 06:20 PM.
    Radically Canadian!

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    Re: Beer

    Thanks for sharing that chart. Some of those ownerships I was aware of, e.g. Granville Island and Goose Island, but others I had no idea, e.g. Lagunitas and Kona. Within the charted conglomerate there's lots of variety of beers, so I think the "Illusion of Choice" is a bit of an exaggeration, unless they're referring to choosing whose pocket the cost of a pint is going into. If a brewery buyout comes with capital to expand the brewery's production and improve distribution then I don't have a problem with it. If however, there's a loss of control over the brewery's product then that's another issue.

    Any chance we might get Lagunitas or Widmer Bros. at Commonwealth instead of Granville Island?
    GO ESKS GO!

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